Silly String to Detect Trip Wires

Time is reporting that Marines in Iraq are using Silly String – the party favor in a can – to detect trip wires. They spray the string – which is really a foam – into a door way and it catches on the foam without tripping the device.

Cool.

The Forgotten Survival Skill By Ron D.

I entered the Survival Blog’s writing contest and my entry was posted today. I’ve been thinking about writing on phsical fitness as a survival skill for awhile now. So when I decided to enter the contest it was the first thing on my mind.

When people talk about preparedness they often focus on the stuff they need. Food, water, guns, and ammo. But they don’t often think about what they need to know and the skills they need to have. Having 50 pounds of flour doesn’t do you any good if you can’t cook bread. Having a rifle with 10,000 rounds of ammo doesn’t help if you can’t shoot. And a first aid kit does little good if you don’t know CPR or how to treat a wound.

A skill is something you have to practice to get good at and stay good at. What skills do you need to learn and practice?

Perceived Risk vs Actual Risk

A great article on Bruce Schneier’s site about the difference between Perceived Risk vs Actual Risk.

Here’s some bullet points

# We over-react to intentional actions, and under-react to accidents, abstract events, and natural phenomena.

# We over-react to things that offend our morals.

# We over-react to immediate threats and under-react to long-term threats.

# We under-react to changes that occur slowly and over time.

Surviving Tech

Haven’t posted in the survival post in a long time. Did you know there was a major natural disaster this week that took out power for an entire US state? Well here’s an article grading tech after Hawaii’s earthquake.

We did a major clean out of the garage a couple of weekends ago and ran across our survival chest. Included a propane stove and canisters and some stick on lights. There was other stuff, but it was interesting to see what stuff the article mentioned. I need to check my survial/disaster supplies. Probably should get some of those light sticks. And I know all the flashlights should have their batteries checked.

Signs of a stroke

Via Clayton Cramer: Signs of a stroke.

During a BBQ a friend stumbled and took a little fall – she assured everyone that she was fine (they offered to call paramedics) and just tripped over a brick because of her new shoes. They got her cleaned up and got her a new plate of food – while she appeared a bit shaken up, Ingrid went about enjoying herself the rest of the evening.

Ingrid’s husband called later telling everyone that his wife
had been taken to the hospital – (at 6:00pm, Ingrid passed away.) She had suffered a stroke at the BBQ – had they known how to identify the signs of a stroke perhaps Ingrid would be with us today.

A neurologist says that if he can get to a stroke victim within 3 hours he can totally reverse the effects of a stroke…totally. He said the trick was getting a stroke recognized, diagnosed an getting to the patient within 3 hours which is tough. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:

RECOGNIZING A STROKE: 3 steps: Read and Learn

1. *Ask the individual to SMILE.

2. *Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

3. *Ask the person to SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently)
(i.e. . .It is sunny out today.)

If he or she has trouble with any of these tasks, call 9-1-1
immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

After discovering that a group of non-medical volunteers could
identify facial weakness, arm weakness and speech problems, researchers urged the general public to learn the three questions. They presented their conclusions at the American Stroke Association’s annual meeting last February.

Widespread use of this test could result in prompt diagnosis and treatment of the stroke and prevent brain damage.

A cardiologist says if everyone who gets this e-mail sends it to 10 people; you can bet that at least one life will be saved.

BE A FRIEND AND SHARE THIS ARTICLE, you could save their lives.

~ Hope you have a very, very good day ~

Evacuee

So I ran away.

Took us 20 hours to get to my folks house in North Arkansas, which normally takes about 10. 4 hours of that was my fault. I decided to try and get tricky and go east a little ways and then north, avoiding the main artery of 59. What I didn’t think of was that was prime route out of Port Arthur and points east. So I decided to follow this convoy of school busses that had a police escort and a little road that wasn’t on my map. Well it turns out they were heading for a 59. So we ended up back at 59 about 20 miles north of where we started. Probably would have made better time just on 59.

That was midnight to 4AM on Thursday night. At 9AM we were about 30 miles north of that at Livingston. We saw a little road on the map and took it east. It was very curvy and 2 lanes, but had no traffic on it. Eventually we ended up at 190 and cut over to 69. Once on 69 it was clean sailing up east Texas to Texarkana and on to my folks.

If you had told me I would be able to stay up with only cat naps in the car for over 36 hours I would have doubted you. But that’s what happen Wednesday and Thursday. I got up for work at 7 or 8 AM worked all day, packed up, got on the road at Midnight and drove till 9 PM the next day. And Wednesday at work wasn’t a normal sit and program day either. It was batton down the hatches, move everything to interior rooms day.

One story I have to tell. About 9 AM after we got of 59, we had the window down so the dog could get some air. A wasp flew in the car. It landed on a pillow the dog was on in my wife’s lap and she caught it in the pillow. I looked for somewhere to pull over and there was a little dirt drive way to a house. So I pulled in there. Up on the hill was a house and there was an older man in front of it doing something. He headed towards my wife who was shaking the pillow out. The dog has also gotten out with her. I thought he was going to get on to us about dumping things in his yard. But as he got closer he asked if we wanted to water the dog. We went up and they gave the dog some water. They asked if we wanted to come in for something to eat, but we said we’d just eaten. The man’s wife came out and gave us a little tupaware container of water to take with us and that served as the dog’s bowl for the rest of the trip. Just good East Texas folk. Didn’t get the woman’s name but the man was Daniel Patrick.

And the one thing I’m going to buy that we didn’t have and needed….a good map of East Texas. The Oklahoma and Texas maps we have are both the same size, but the Texas map covers 4 times the area. We need a map of just east Texas.

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May Rain This Weekend

I’m writing this on the North side of Houston, Texas. Right now everyone is thinking and talking about Rita. It’s not unusual for Texans to talk about a Rita that will wipe you out, but normally it involves tequila and not Cat 5 winds.

We’re doing some preparing. We like to think were “into” preparedness, but when the most likely disaster – a hurricane – comes knocking, we realize just what’s missing. So I went of NOAA’s hurricane preparedness list. I’ll be making a trip to the sporting goods store. The Mrs and I may make a run to Costco for non-perishable food, and we need to figure out how to store 28+ gallons of water.

Of course my boss pointed out that while everyone is getting all in a uproar, and they are starting to evacuate Galveston today, the NOAA is saying there is only a 9% chance Galveston will get hit. Though the plot shows it almost directly hitting.

Oh and the Mrs is going to Orlando this weekend. She may miss all the fun.

UPDATE: Looks like the Galveston probability is up to 11% and the Texas coast is about 60% of the total. I’m not going to keep updating as it changes. Assume these numbers were as of 11 AM.

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