The greatest power we need in our lives is the power to begin again.

That’s a quote from today’s reading that I highlighted because it seemed to be reactuate.

On a side note don’t you wish we could only get depressed about things that have actually happen, and not about things that might happen? Or that feelings, especially bad ones, didn’t sometimes show up first and try to find something to attach to. I was ecstatically happy yesterday, and I woke up this morning depressed. It’s crazy.

OMTL has the some of the same underlying themes as Fight Club. Fight Club is the personally violent, testosterone filled version. The central question “Is your safe, middle class, secure existence what you want? What you were made for?”

There is a scene where Tyler is driving a car irradically down the road and asks the two guys in the back “What would you do if you knew you were going to die?”
“Paint a self-portrait”
“Build a house.”
Came the immediate responses because these guys had thought about it. But Edward Norton’s character couldn’t come up with anything. I’ve always liked that movie because to me it is about middle class existential angst, something I can understand.

Anyway, back to the questions from the book.

OK, after reading them this isn’t a day I want to blog. It requires a list of past failures and how you dealt with them. A list of reasons you don’t trust God with your problems, and how it would change if you only had one month to live.

Writing that made me think of one thing. I worry my actions will screw up my kids. If I had one month to live I’d have to give that up. It’s out of my hands. I’d tell them I loved them and wanted them to be good men, but I’d realize if that was going to happen only God would be able to do it. But when I “know” I’ve got forever to live, or at least until they get out of the house, I think it is my job to make them good men. Mmmm. Makes you think.